• Writing Tips and Tricks

    Which vs That

    It can be difficult to know the difference between ‘which’ or ‘that’ and when to use either in a sentence. Both sound like they can easily be swapped out for each other depending on your mood. But there’s one general rule. ‘That’ is for a restrictive cause and ‘which’ is for a non-restrictive clause. What does this mean? Use ‘that’ when needing to define the subject of the sentence. For example, ‘The fabrics that I need to sew my dress are expensive.’ The phrase ‘that I need to sew my dress’ defines which fabrics are expensive. Without the ‘that’ the sentence will imply all fabrics are expensive. Use ‘which’ when…

  • Writing Tips and Tricks

    Em dash, en dash and hyphen

    It can be hard for people to know the difference between the three dashes. Some people don’t even know there’s three different types. Luckily, I’ve set out the general grammar rules to follow below: Em dash — The Em dash is the length of an ‘m’. Em dash can be used instead of a colon, to indicate missing words or draw more attention to a sentence. For example, Early intervention—the best chance of success. En dash – En dash is the length of an ‘n’ and is used for a range. For example, 1–10, January–March. Hyphen – Hyphen, well, everyone knows what a hyphen looks like. It’s used to join words together. For…

  • Writing Tips and Tricks

    Word cutting

    With limited spare time, it’s tough to get anyone to read anything. A big part of writing is cutting out words, so people only read what they need to. Make it a game to review every sentence and simplify. If you even cut out one word from every sentence, by the end of the page you’ll save a paragraph. Here’s how: Common phrases like ‘to be honest’, ‘very’ and ‘indeed’ can be deleted. Why? It doesn’t add any value to the sentence. If you write ‘to be honest’ it implies the rest of the communication may not be truthful. Furthermore, ‘very’ is a filler word. Instead of ‘very happy’, very…

  • Writing Tips and Tricks

    FANBOYS

    It’s a common myth you can’t start a sentence with a conjunction: For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, So (FANBOYS). We are taught at school it’s grammatical incorrect, because it’s easier to teach. At a young age a conjunction can easily become a fragmented sentence or be used incorrectly. Nevertheless, I don’t believe in deliberately teaching children the wrong thing (Santa Claus anyone?). Because as adults, these beliefs can still stick with them. Yet, starting a sentence with a conjunction is not a new written style. It’s in classic novels like The Emperor’s New Clothes. People naturally say ‘and’ or ‘but’ to start a sentence, so why not in writing? Unless you’re…